Three quick Scala plugs

I’m still thinking about the dependency-injection and Akka stuff and will have at least one more longish post on the subject, but I’ve recently become distracted by refactoring some of my old JavaScript code into ClojureScript and figuring out Clojure’s new core.async library (ultimately I hope to form all of these distractions into a ring instead of a straight line, at which time I will be the acme of productivity, but that’s another story). But before I get too deep into Clojure land I wanted to plug a few Scala-related things I’ve come across recently.

Firstly, Derek Wyatt’s book Akka Concurrency: Building reliable software in a multi-core world is excellent, covering a great many Akka topics in an enjoyable style. In particular, his chapter on testing seems profoundly relevant to the mock injection topics I’ve been thinking about, but I haven’t quite absorbed it yet. The whole thing is refreshingly up to date, too (which makes sense since it was only published a month or two ago), and it doesn’t pad out its length with a lot of “learn Scala in 30 days” remedial material. Anyways, I recommend it thoroughly.

Secondly, John Sullivan’s long post about the cake pattern is by far the best treatment I’ve seen of it online, and is required reading for anyone interested in dependency injection in Scala. (It’s been up for several months now but somehow I missed it until recently.) John has written a dependency-injection framework, congeal, which makes instant intuitive sense for me as someone coming from a Java / Spring background; unfortunately it depends on some macro stuff which won’t make it into Scala’s mainline, so it isn’t ready for prime time and will need to be rewritten down the road once Scala’s macros reach their next stable state. There’s a video from ScalaDays 2013 describing the framework.

And finally, following up on the subject of the cake pattern, Daniel Spiewak’s keynote from NEScala, “The Bakery from the Black Lagoon,” is an excellent talk which made me think about the cake pattern in a new way (as more of a compiler-enforced module system than as a form of dependency injection). His implementation of the cake pattern is also interestingly different from most examples I’ve seen online – in particular, he mostly eschews self-types, with the exception of needing one for a virtual class.

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